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Archive for the ‘Grenache’ Category

6 Budget Friendly Wines for Thanksgiving

Posted by Gabe on November 21, 2014

Thanksgiving is less than a week away! That means we all need some wine to serve our guests or ourselves, preferably both. Spending top dollar to get good wines is fairly simple. Finding value driven offerings that get the job done is a bit more challenging. Here are some delicious selections that will work well for your Thanksgiving meal. With one exception they all clock in under $25. Even at lower price points it’s nice to have one splurge wine to consider.

Espirit du Rhone 2013 Cotes du Rhone AOC ($11.99)

This wine blends together Grenache (60%), Syrah 30%), Carignan (5%), and Cinsault (5%). 1,000 cases of this wine have been imported to the US. Hints of anise and rhubarb aromas present on the nose here. The palate is studded with purple fruits, dry currants and Montmorency cherry. Bits of finely ground espresso join nutmeg and cinnamon on the finish. Medium tannins soften with a little bit of air. This acid rich, food friendly wine will pair with everything on your Thanksgiving table.

Decopas 2013 Malbec ($12)

All of the fruit for this wine comes from the Mendoza region of Argentina. It’s comprised entirely of estate bottled Malbec. This deeply colored hue of this wine is striking in the glass. Plum, violet, and a little hint of vanilla bean wafts from the appealing nose. The palate is loaded with sumptuous and juicy black fruit flavors such as blackberry and raspberry. Bay leaf characteristics, sour black cherry and a hint of dark chocolate mark the lip smacking finish. Decopas Malbec will pair well hard cheeses, meat based stuffing, ham and the bird itself. Decant this one for an hour and it’ll really pop.

Esporão Verdelho ($12.99)

The fruit for this wine was sourced from vines with an average age of 10 years on them. It’s composed entirely of Verdelho. It was fermented in a temperature controlled environment, stabilized, filtered and bottled without any oak influence. Hints of lemon and lots of fleshy yellow melon jump from the nose here. The palate has loads of green apple flavors, more citrus and lemon characteristics, as well as a dollop of white pepper. Grapefruit and lemon zest light up the crisp and refreshing finish. Hand your guests a glass of this when they walk through the door on Thanksgiving, they may drink it all day and never switch to red.

Georges Dubeouf Chateau les Capitans Julienas 2011 ($18.99)

All of the fruit for this wine was picked by hand. It’s composed entirely of Gamay. It was fermented in a temperature controlled environment using native yeast. Red cherry and cranberry fill the nose along with hints of toast. A cornucopia of dried red fruits and savory spices fill the flavorful, medium bodied palate. The finish lingers with continued red fruits, black tea, minerals and warming spices. This wine is tasty on it’s own but really shines with food.

Esporão Reserva Red ($24.99)

This offering blends together Aragonês, Trincaeira, Cabernet Sauvignon and Alicante Bouschet. Each grape was harvested and vinified separately. Barrel aging occurred over 12 months in American (70%), and French (30%) oak; 12 months of bottle aging followed prior to release. This red blend has a beautiful deep, dark purple color. Red and black fruits mix with copious spices on the welcoming and heady nose. There’s an inherent earthiness that leads the palate. Red and black fruits join in along with lots of spices. Cherry, strawberry, and black pepper are all joined by bits of roasted coffee bean on the above average finish. This wine has medium tannins and terrific acidity. Esporão Reserva Red is just begging to be paired with food. It’ll excel with just about anything you throw at it, making it a natural for the day of the bird.

Flora Springs 2012 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($40)

All of the fruit for this wine came from Napa Valley. In addition to Cabernet Sauvignon (95%), small amounts of Malbec (3%), and Petit Verdot (2%) were also blended in. It was aged over 22 months in a combination of French (71%), and American oak (29%). Black Currant, cherry and Mexican Vanilla bean aromas are omnipresent on the nose. Black cherry with a splash of a liqueur dominates the palate which is plush and lush in its easy drinking, smooth nature. Crushed velvet, continued black and red cherry, earth, espresso and chicory are all present on the finish along with a hint of bitter chocolate. This is a fine example of Napa Valley Cabernet that drinks impeccably right out of the bottle. It does down easy and also has good depth and complexity.

Posted in Argentina, Blends, Cabernet Sauvignon, Carignane, Gamay, Grenache, Malbec, Napa Valley, Syrah/Shiraz, Verdelho, Wine | Leave a Comment »

Eleven Wines You Should Be Drinking Now

Posted by Gabe on November 19, 2014

Wine shelves all over the country are jammed with countless selections and choices are so varied it can be dizzying. With that in mind, I’m here to help you work your way through the haze of bottles. I tasted through more than three dozen wines across all price ranges and stylistic tiers, and here are my 11 favorites from the bunch.

Hugel et Fils 2012 Gentil ($15)

This vintage of “Gentil” blends together pinot gris (23 percent), pinot blanc (21 percent), riesling (20 percent), sylvaner (20 percent), gewurztraminer (14 percent), and muscat (2 percent). Fermentation took place in temperature-controlled vats. It was gently fined and filtered prior to bottling. Lychee fruit aromas dominate the inviting nose of this French blend. “Gentil” has a palate stuffed with white and yellow melon, peach, and apricot flavors. Head over to The Daily Meal to read the rest.

Posted in Blends, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Grenache, Pinot Noir, Rosé, Sauvignon Blanc, Syrah/Shiraz, Tempranillo, The Daily Meal, Wine, Zinfandel | Leave a Comment »

Visiting Clif Family Winery in the Heart of Napa Valley

Posted by Gabe on September 4, 2014

Clif Family Winery RifugioMost every moment I spend in wine regions I’m on the hunt. Of course I’m looking for excellent wine, but when I’m on the ground somewhere I’m searching for brilliant tasting experiences too. They come in every shape and size, offering everything from just wine, to light pairings, all the way to full on meals accompanying wines. I just spent 10 days split between Napa Valley and Sonoma County; and on this trip alone had a huge variety of experiences. Many of them were quite good and well worth mentioning. One, however, stood above the pack. To say my tasting at Clif Family Winery was a homerun would be to sell the experience short. The tasting at Clif Family Winery is a Hall-of-Fame-caliber tasting, easily in the top five tasting experiences available in Napa Valley. Head over to The Daily Meal to read the rest.

Posted in Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Grenache, Napa Valley, Riesling, The Daily Meal, Wine, Winery Visit, Zinfandel | Leave a Comment »

A Couple of Thoughts About Australian Wine Today

Posted by Gabe on February 23, 2014

A few weeks back I was at the Australia Today Trade Show in New York City. While there, I had the opportunity to sample a wide array of wines coming out of Australia. Most of them were current releases, in a few cases there were some older vintages being showcased during a sit down seminar. Most obvious when tasting a wide swath of Aussie releases is the diversity and breadth of the offerings. This is true both in terms of grape varietals and style of finished wines. If overripe Shiraz is your only image of Australian wine, you’re in for a stunning and pleasant surprise. There are wines of all shapes and sizes being made in Australia. Here’s a look at a couple of selections from the event that really stood out.

Running With Bulls 2012 Tempranillo – This wine from the Barossa Valley and it sells for around $17. Aromas of violets and plum leap from the effusive nose of this wine. Cherry characteristics lead a grab bag of warming red fruits and spices on the plate of the Running With Bulls Tempranillo. The finish is above average in length and persistent. Red fruits continue along with bits of earth and leather. This is a well balanced wine that will excel with hard cheeses and pretty much anything that comes off of your grill. It’s a solid example of Tempranillo that shows how adaptable this varietal can be to a region like the Barossa Valley which is so different from its more native Rioja.

St Hallett Old Block 2010 Shiraz - This Barossa Valley Shiraz sells for around $80. This Shiraz shows off a deep, dark hue that is stunning in the glass. Violets and spice lead a welcoming nose. The palate is succulent and juicy. It’s layered with black plum, black raspberry, and cassis. Minerals and earth lead a dense, structured finish that has great length and depth. Black fruits continue their prominence along with pepper and bits of dusty cocoa. This is a classic example of Shiraz; it’s loaded with bold, fruity flavor. Pair it with equally bold, full flavored foods.

Peter Lehmann 1999 Stonewell Shiraz – This Shiraz is a library selection and as such isn’t widely available anymore. However it is more than worth mentioning because it showcases the ability of Australian wines in general and Shiraz in particular to age well under the right conditions. Those conditions of course include the right vintages as well as stylistic choices made when picking grapes and producing the wine. A bit of chocolate sauce leads the nose here along with Kirsch Liqueur. The palate is studded with a seemingly endless array of cherry characteristics, both red and black. At 15 years old there are still loads of fruit here and it shows itself off in a rich, powerful way. It’s muscular and shows off earth that goes alongside the fruit, but it’s also controlled in intensity. All of these elements continue through the persistent finish. It would be a brilliant match for pasta with Wild Boar Ragu, or Pot Roast to name a couple of options.

Shadow Chaser 2012 Grenache – This Grenache is from  McLaren Vale and it sells for around $15. The fruit came from two vineyards with over 40 years of age on each. After fermentation it was aged entirely in stainless steel tanks prior to bottling. Raspberry, and strawberry aromas fill the nose of this wine. These red fruits continue through the palate where they’re joined by bits of red cherry and a copious amount of spices. Cinnamon, clove and black pepper are all in evidence. Rhubarb, sour cherries and glycerin notes all emerge in the finish which has above average length for the price category. Grenache can make some of the food friendliest wines in the world. This example certainly fits that bill. It’ll pair with a wide array foods and it’s a terrific value as well.

These wines represent a tiny window into some of the great things being done in Australia today. The breadth and variety is very impressive. There are offerings at every conceivable price point coming out of Australia that represent solid or better values. If you haven’t had any Australian wines in awhile, now is a good time to dive back in, we’re seeing greater diversity on US shelves than ever before.

Posted in Australia, Grenache, Syrah/Shiraz, Tempranillo | Leave a Comment »

Vallformosa Cavas – Classic Brut (NV) / Origen Brut Rosado

Posted by Gabe on September 30, 2013

_Rose_Bottle_2What comes to mind when I mention Spain; Rioja perhaps? And when I bring up Sparkling Wine, Champagne or Prosecco? There’s a lot more to Spain than Rioja and much more in the category of Sparking Wine. Most every wine growing country has a Sparkling Wine tradition of some kind. Spain has an excellent one with a long history making Cava. I recently tasted the wines of Vallformosa at Corkbuzz Wine Studio in Manhattan. Corkbuzz is a terrific place to attend a wine event. The space is welcoming, the servers super helpful and the food absolutely delicious. We went through 4 courses of small bites paired with Different Cava’s and was a place I plan to return to so I can taste more of their food and dive into their excellent wine list. Vallformosa is currently in it’s 5th generation making Cava. We tasted through a number of their current releases, here’s a look at the two that stood out the most for me.

The Vallformosa Classic Brut (NV) was produced from fruit sourced in the Cava D.O. of Penedes Spain. This offering blends together Xarel-lo (40%), Macabeo (30%), and Parallada (30%). Primary fermentation took place in stainless steel followed by secondary fermentation in bottle using the traditional method. Aging took place over a year. 12,000 cases of this Cava were produced and it has a suggested retail price of $16.99. Apple and toasted almond aromas are apparent on the nose of this Cava. The palate shows off continued orchard fruit in the form of green apple, wisps of lemon zest and sufficient acidity to think keeps a little zippy. The fruit flavors are joined by a gentle kiss of crème fraiche on the finish which has good length. This is a refreshing wine that is delicious on its own and with food. It’s a Classic Brut in style and also a classic example of Cava.

The Vallformosa Origen Brut Rosado was produced from fruit sourced in the Cava D.O. of Penedes Spain. This selection is a blend of Garnacha (90%) and Monastrell. Primary fermentation took place in temperature controlled stainless steel; Secondary fermentation followed in bottle using the traditional method. Aging took place over 12 months. 150,000 6 bottle cases were produced and this wine has a suggested retail price of $19.99. Bright berry aromas leap from the nose of this Rosado. The palate is intense and fruity with depth and layers to spare. Cherry, raspberry and subtle bits of strawberry are all present. These flavors all carry through the persistent finish, along with a nice dollop of creaminess and pepper spice. This Cava paired well with the array of different foods that Corkbuzz Wine Studio had laid in front of us, but it was particularly inspired alongside pork belly.

If you find yourself in Manhattan, Corkbuzz Wine Studio is a spot you’ll want to check out, they offer a lot and they do it quite well. They’re a wine bar, but really so much more than that title implies. When you’re looking for Sparkling Wine to pair with your meal or celebrate an occasion the Cava’s from Vallformosa are ones you should consider. They’re well priced and offer excellent value for the quality they offer. The wines above each pair well with food, but the Rosado in particular is a stunning match with a truly wide array of flavors and textures. It would be an excellent choice to serve at Thanksgiving as it would undoubtedly marry well with the myriad of flavors found on that Holiday’s typically diverse table.

Posted in Cava, Grenache, Macabeo, Mourvedre, Parallada, Sparkling Wine, Xarel-lo | Leave a Comment »

Campo Viejo – 2012 Garnacha

Posted by Gabe on September 26, 2013

The Rioja region of Spain is bet known for wines based on Tempranillo. Often these are single varietal wines, other times they have small amounts of indigenous local varieties blended in as well. Campo Viejo is a winery that falls right into that description. They make a number of Tempranillo based wines in different tiers within the Spanish wine aging laws. Now they have added the first ever Garnacha to their portfolio. Here’s a look at it.

The Campo Viejo 2012 Garnacha is an inaugural release for this well known, widely distributed winery based in the Rioja region of Spain. This release is made entirely of Garnacha sourced at their vineyards in the Alfaro and Aldeanueva sections of Rioja Baja. Fermentation took place in temperature controlled stainless steel vats. Aging in French oak barrels took place over 4 months. This wine is available all over the country and has a suggested retail price of $12.00. Violets and dark, heady fruit aromas emerge from the nose of this 2012 Garnacha. A gentle wisp of vanilla bean is present as well. The palate is studded with plum, blueberry and raspberry flavors. Spices such as pepper and clove are present as well and lead to the finish which shows off rhubarb and strawberry as well as tiny bits of anise seed. The finish has solid length for the price range.

Pinot Noir gets a ton of play as a food friendly wine that pairs with a wide array of cuisines, and that reputation is often deserved. Garnacha doesn’t get as much attention for this, but it deserves it. Well made, wines based on this varietal are just as food friendly if not more so in some cases. This example from Campo Viejo is well priced for everyday consumption and a solid choice to keep a case or so of around as a house wine.

Posted in Grenache, Wine | Leave a Comment »

Domaines Paul Mas – 2011 Estate Pinot Noir / 2011 Estate Malbec / Chateau Paul Mas 2011 Clos de Savignac

Posted by Gabe on September 12, 2013

European wine can be intimidating to wine drinkers for a variety of reasons. Those with an interest in wine but who aren’t total geeks about it don’t necessarily know the nuances of labeling and what might be in a particular bottle due to it generally listing region as opposed to varietal content. Stylistically many old world wines are often subtler than their new world counterparts and it can take time for palates to come around to the layered charms of those often elegant offerings. In contrast to all of that Domaines Paul Mas from the Languedoc region of France has some releases that are labeled in such a way that even the budding wine lover can easily discern contents. Additionally they are making wines that bridge the gap in style between the old and new worlds. Here’s a look at three of their current releases.

The Paul Mas 2011 Estate Pinot Noir is a single vineyard effort. All of the fruit for this wine came from their St. Hilaire Vineyard located in the Languedoc Region. This offering is 100% Pinot Noir. After maceration the fruit was fermented in a temperature controlled environment for approximately 9 days. Aging took place over 6 months in stainless steel, followed by 2 months in bottle prior to release. This wine has a suggested retail price of $14. Aromas of Strawberry and red cherry fill the nose of this Pinot Noir along with secondary characteristics such as mushroom. Those red fruit characteristics carry through the palate which is towards the more substantial side for Pinot Noir. Minerals, spice and earth are all in strong evidence on the finish which has good length. Medium tannins and zippy acidity lend to a nice backbone and structure here. This is a Pinot from the old world that shows off new world flavors while still being proportionate.

The Paul Mas 2011 Estate Malbec is a single vineyard wine. All of the fruit for this selection was sourced at the Gardemiel Vineyard. This is a 100% varietal offering. This wine is available throughout the country and has a suggested retail price of $14. This Malbec has a really lifted nose with super expressive aromatics. Floral characteristics and deep, dark plum are both part of the equation. The palate is fruit driven but elegant and quite proportionate. Dark fruit flavors abound and are joined by a copious amount of spice. The finish is generous and velvety in nature with continued lush fruits and bits of earth as well. Firm acidity keeps things in check here. Soft tannins help this go down easy. This is a very expressive example of Malbec loaded with layers of fruit. This wine will pair well with roasted meats and hard cheeses to name a few good partners.

The Chateau Paul Mas 2011 Clos de Savignac was produced from fruit sourced at a single vineyard within Languedoc. This offering blends together Mourvèdre (50%), Syrah (30%), and Grenache (20%). This selection has a suggested retail price of $27. Aromas of violets and white pepper lead the nose of this blend. Blackberry and blueberry play key roles on the palate with black raspberry present as well. Black cherry and rhubarb characteristics emerge on the finish along with leather, espresso and baker’s chocolate. Firm, chewy tannins and acidity are present here. This blend of three classic varieties has substantial depth of palate and generous length and overall complexity for its price point. In its youth this wine will pair best with substantial foods.

This is a distinct trio of wines from a couple of different tiers in the Domaines Paul Mas line that shares some similarities. Each of the wines is balanced and proportionate. These are grapes that have thrived in France for years but the style here tilts towards the new world while not quite tipping all the way over. They’re eminently drinkable, food friendly and well priced for the quality they represent. Both the Pinot Noir and the Malbec are delicious now and will drink well for the next several years. The Clos de Savignac is a touch on the young side right now. Decanting it for an hour or so is recommended for immediate consumption. However patience will be rewarded. Lay it down for 5 or so years and it will be even more expressive and lovely. These wines are well worth seeking out. In particular if you’re drinking a lot of new world wines and are looking for a bridge back to the old world, these will get you there rather deliciously.

Posted in Grenache, Malbec, Mourvedre, Pinot Noir, Syrah/Shiraz, Wine | Leave a Comment »

Hecht & Bannier – Côtes de Provence 2012 Rosé / 2009 Bandol

Posted by Gabe on July 12, 2013

Hecht & Bannier was founded in 2002 by Gregory Hecht and Francois Bannier. They set themselves up in the style of traditional French Negociants with a goal of creating reference point releases in each region they produce wines from. The latest additions to their portfolio are a couple of wines from Provence. Here’s a look at them.

The Hecht & Bannier Côtes de Provence 2012 Rosé was produced from a blend of Grenache (45%), Cinsault (40%) and Syrah (15%). The grapes utilized were sourced at a variety of vineyards, some in the foothills of Montagne Sainte-Victorie and others high altitude vineyards of Haute-Provence. The fruit was picked overnight during cooler hours to assure the preservation of freshness. This wine has a suggested retail price of $18. The light salmon hue of this offering is both beautiful and immediately striking. Engaging floral characteristics emerge from the nose. The palate is fruity, spice, dry, lithe and absolutely lovely. Cherry, strawberry, bits of orange zest and white pepper are all in play from the first sip through the above average finish. This wine goes down easily and it also has the depth and complexity to keep things interesting. It’s really a super appealing wine that you’re going to want to buy a few bottles of as they disappear quick once they’re open.

The Hecht & Bannier 2009 Bandol was produced from a blend of Mourvèdre (80%), Grenache (10%) and Cinsault (10%). After harvesting and fermentation the wine spent 20 months aging in large oak foudre; an additional six months in cement vats followed prior to bottling. This red blend has a suggested retail price of $38. Blackberry, toast and vanilla bean aromas fill the nose of this 2009 red blend. The palate is big and burly, loaded with brawny red and black fruit flavors like blueberry and rhubarb. Spices such as nutmeg and black pepper are present as well as an undercurrent of minerals. Espresso notes and bits of baker’s chocolate emerge on the finish which has excellent length. Leathery tannins and firm acidity are part of this wine’s solid structure. This will pair well with full flavored foods. For best results decent this offering for about 90 minutes so it can express all of its charms.

These wines from Hecht & Bannier represent both solid values which provide plenty of drinking pleasure. Equally as important they’re also fine and genuine representatives of Provence.

Posted in Blends, Cinsault, Grenache, Mourvedre, Rosé, Syrah/Shiraz, Wine | Leave a Comment »

Real Compania de Vinos – 2011 Garnacha

Posted by Gabe on June 6, 2013

Pinot Noir gets a lot of play as a food friendly grape that pairs with all sorts of cuisine; and often that is the case. Wines based on Garnacha (Grenache) are frequently just as suited to pairing with all sorts of food. Additionally the entry level price for getting delicious Garnacha is lower than that for Pinot Noir which can be a bit sketchy in the value category. Today I’ll look at a Garnacha that it perfectly suited for everyday drinking for a number of reasons.

The Real Compania de Vinos 2011 Garnacha was produced using fruit sourced in central Spain. The vines had an average of 20 to 50 years of age on them. This wine is 100% varietal. All of the fruit was hand harvested and sorted. Fermentation took place in stainless steel over 12 days. 12,000 cases of this offering were produced and it has a suggested retail price of $9.99.

Cherry and subtle vanilla bean aromas lead a booming and friendly nose loaded with charm. Red and black berry fruits dominate the palate with hints of jam poking through along with touches of spice. The big flavors that mark the palate continue through the finish along with black and white pepper, earth and black tea elements. This Garnacha is absolutely primed to pair with food. It’ll work all summer with just about anything you pull of your grill as one example. For the money this wine has good depth and concentration. It’s a really nice value for under $10, and it’ll please a whole lot of people, so it’s definitely one to consider if you’re headed to a picnic or BBQ.

Posted in Grenache, Wine | Leave a Comment »

Yes Virginia, Rosé (Sometimes) Does Age Well; Case In Point Chêne Bleu

Posted by Gabe on April 22, 2013

Common perception holds that Rosé’s don’t age well. Sometimes common beliefs are totally wrong and in other cases they become foregone conclusions for a good reason. In the case of Rosé’s longevity the truth is not 100% either of those things. Reality is that very few Rosés are built to age well.  Some will hang around and be quite tasty for a couple of years but most go south after that. I’m the sort of person who is perfectly content drinking good, dry Rosé in the middle of winter, so I’m a fan. When the opportunity popped up to taste several vintages of Rosé from Chêne Bleu out of both standard bottle and magnum for some vintages over a meal, how could I resist?

Chêne Bleu is a project that began 20 years back. The husband and wife team of Nicole & Xavier Rolet began restoration of a property in the Southern Rhone that had been lying dormant for many, many years. Their work included restitution of the vineyards which are now farmed sustainably as well as the estate house itself. It was a massive undertaking and took years from start to fruition of their first vintage. They make several other wines such as Viognier, two Red Rhone blends and a White Rhone Blend, but Rosé represents the lion’s share of their production.

The current release is the Chêne Bleu 2012 Rosé. This vintage it was produced from a blend of Grenache (60%), Syrah (35%), and Cinsault (5%). Prior to 2011, they weren’t using Cinsault in this wine yet. The Grenache and Syrah vines utilized have 40 and 30 years of age on them respectively. This wine which was produced using entirely natural methods and finished in screw-cap has a suggested retail price of $28. It’s also available in large format bottles. The Chêne Bleu Rosé has a lovely pale, pink hue, just the sort of color that comes to mind when I daydream about deliciously dry Rosé. This wine has a big nose loaded with gentle red fruit aromas; strawberry and bits of Bing cherry are both in evidence. The palate is gentle and layered with boatloads of flavor. Ref berry flavors dominate with citrus and hints of stone fruit taking part as well. There is crisp acidity and tons of spice such as white pepper and cardamom on a finish that is long and persistent. This wine is absolutely delicious all by itself; however it’s also well suited to pair with a fairly wide array of foods.

A couple things are of particular note having had the chance to taste vintages as far back as the 2007. One is the overriding fact that these wines age well for at least a 5 year period. Another is that the ones poured out of Magnum had some similarities. I found them both to show off a bit more spice and a couple of extra hints of sour fruit on the finish. Unlike the 750 ml bottles, the magnums were finished in cork. Regardless both we quite tasty, but the subtle differences are worth mentioning and looking for if you have a chance to drink them out of different formats

Across the board the Chêne Bleu wines are well made, proportionate offerings that are built to accompany food. Any of them would be welcome on my table at anytime, however I have a special place in my heart for Rosé and now I have a new one to drink regularly. If you love good dry Rosé you should make a special effort to obtain the Chêne Bleu. If for some crazy reason you don’t already love Rosé this could be the wine to turn you. They say every true wine lover eventually falls head over heels for Rose; so why wait, get some Chêne Bleu now.

Posted in Cinsault, Grenache, Rosé, Syrah/Shiraz, Wine | Leave a Comment »

 
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